THIS DAY IN AVIATION

15 October 1937

Oct 15, 2017

Boeing XB-15 takes off on its first flight, Boeing Field, 15 October 1937. (U.S. Air Force) 15 October 1937: Free-lance test pilot Edmund Turney (“Eddie”) Allen made the first flight of the prototype Boeing XB-15, 35-277, at Boeing Field, Seattle, Washington. The Boeing Model 294, designated XB-15 by the Air Corps, was an experimental airplane…

Read More

14 October 1969

Oct 14, 2017

Master Sergeant Donald G. Smith, United States Air Force. The President of the United States of America, authorized by Section 8742, Title 10, United States Code, awards the Air Force Cross to Technical Sergeant Donald G. Smith for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Pararescueman on a HH-3E Rescue…

Read More

14 October 1962

Oct 14, 2017

This is one of the reconnaissance photographs taken by Major Richard S. Heyser  from his Lockheed U-2, flying at 72,500 feet over Cuba, 14 October 1962. (U.S. Air Force) 14 October 1962: Major Richard Stephen (“Steve”) Heyser, a pilot with the 4028th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, United States Air Force, boarded Item…

Read More

14 October 1947

Oct 14, 2017

Captain Charles Elwood (“Chuck”) Yeager, U.S. Air Force, with “Glamorous Glennis,” the Bell XS-1. (U.S. Air Force/National Air and Space Museum) 14 October 1947: At approximately 10:00 a.m., a four-engine Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bomber, piloted by Major Robert L. Cardenas, took off from Muroc Air Force Base (now know as Edwards Air Force Base)…

Read More

14 October 1944

Oct 14, 2017

Ann Gilpin Baumgartner, circa 1944. (National Air and Space Museum) 14 October 1944: Ann Gilpin Baumgartner, a member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) assigned as Assistant Operations Officer of the Fighter Section, Flight Test Division, at Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio, made an evaluation flight of the Bell YP-59A Airacomet, becoming the first woman to…

Read More

12 October 1976

Oct 12, 2017

Sikorsky S-72 RSRA 72001 in initial configuration. (Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin Company) 12 October 1976: The Sikorsky S-72 Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) made its first flight at Stratford, Connecticut. The S-72 was a hybrid aircraft built for the United States Army and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Its purpose was to serve as…

Read More

4–11 October 1933

Oct 11, 2017

Kingsford Smith’s Percival Gull G-ACJV after taking off from Lympne, 4 October 1933 Sir Charles Edward Kingsford Smith, MC, AFC. (Monash University Library) After a positioning flight from Heston on 3 October 1933, at 5:28 a.m. British Summer Time (B.S.T.), on Wednesday, 4 October, Sir Charles Kingsford Smith took off from Lympne Aerodrome, Kent en…

Read More

9 October 1890

Oct 9, 2017

Clément Ader, self portrait. (Ader Museum–Muret) 9 October 1890: At the Chateau d’Amainvilliers, near Bretz, Clément Ader’s flying machine, Éole, flew for the first time. An inventor, Ader had recently spent months in Algeria, observing the vultures. When he returned to France he began to design and build a bat-like machine with a wing spread of 46 feet (14 meters),…

Read More

3–5 October 1931

Oct 5, 2017

Hugh Herndon, jr. (left) and Clyde Pangborn in the cockpit of Miss Veedol, just before takeoff at Sabashiro Beach, Misawa, Honshu, Japan, 3 October 1931. (Aviation Museum) 3–5 October 1931: At 6:01 a.m., local time, 4 October (21:01, 3 October, Greenwich Mean Time), Clyde Edward Pangborn and Hugh Herndon, Jr., flying their Bellanca Skyrocket, Miss…

Read More

3 October 1920

Oct 3, 2017

Ensign William Merrill Corry, Jr., United States Navy, March 1913. (F. Brunel/United States Navy Bureau of Personnel) Lieutenant Commander William Merrill Corry, Jr., United States Navy, was assigned as aviation aide to Admiral William Braid Wilson, Jr., Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet, aboard the battleship USS Pennsylvania (BB-38). On Saturday, 2 October 1920, Lieutenant Commander Corry, in…

Read More

29 September 1931

Sep 29, 2017

Supermarine S.6B S.1595 at the London Science Museum 29 September 1931: After waiting all day for the fog to clear, at 5:49 p.m., Flight Lieutenant George Hedley Stainforth of the Royal Air Force High-Speed Flight at RAF Calshot, made a 43-second takeoff run and began an attempt to set a new Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI)…

Read More

27 September 1964

Sep 27, 2017

Captain Michael N. Antoniou with 702 (FAI) 27 September 1964: Captain Michael N. Antoniou flew the number two Bell YUH-1D-BF Iroquois, 60-6029, Bell Helicopter serial number 702, from Edwards Air Force Base in the high desert of southern California, non-stop to Rogers, Arkansas. The distance flown was 2,170.70 kilometers (1,348.81 miles), and established a Fédération…

Read More

26 September 2003

Sep 26, 2017

“David Hempleman-Adams, left, with Saint John resident Jim Rogers on Sept. 26, 2003, just before the balloon launch.” (Kings County Record) 26 September 2003: At 2:38 a.m., Friday, David Kim Hempleman-Adams, OBE, lifted off  from the athletic field of Sussex Elementary School, Sussex, New Brunswick, Canada, in his Rozière balloon on a four-day transatlantic flight. Hempleman-Adams was…

Read More

25 September 1903

Sep 25, 2017

The Wright Brothers’ camp at the Kill Devil Hills. 25 September 1903: Orville and Wilbur Wright arrived at the Kill Devil Hills, Kittyhawk, North Carolina, to begin testing their first powered airplane. © 2015, Bryan R. Swopes by The post 25 September 1903 appeared first on This Day in Aviation. Source: This Day in Aviation

Read More

24 September 1901

Sep 24, 2017

Newton House, 118–119 Picadilly, London. English Heritage Building ID: 424292 24 September 1901:¹ During a balloon ascent at the Crystal Palace, the Aero Club of Great Britain was founded by Frank Hedges Butler, his daughter Vera Hedges Butler, and Charles Stewart Rolls, modeled after the Royal Automobile Club. The Club was established to “. .…

Read More

19 September 1944

Sep 19, 2017

19 September 1944: Air Ministry, 13th November, 1945.      The KING has been graciously pleased to confer the VICTORIA CROSS on the undermentioned officer in recognition of most conspicuous bravery:— Flight Lieutenant David Samuel Anthony LORD, D.F.C. (49149), R.A.F., 271 Sqn. (deceased). Flight Lieutenant Lord was pilot and captain of a Dakota aircraft detailed to…

Read More

19 September 1902

Sep 19, 2017

Stanley Spencer’s airship over London. 19 September 1902: The New York Times reported: AN AIRSHIP TRAVELS NEARLY THIRTY MILES Stanley Spencer, the Aeronaut, Astonishes Londoners. He Starts from the Crystal Palace and Descends Near Harrow—Makes Various Detours.      LONDON, Sept. 20.—Stanley Spencer, the well-known English aeronaut, yesterday successfully accomplished a remarkable flight over London in…

Read More

18 September 1947

Sep 18, 2017

In a visual reminder of United States Air Force heritage, a World War II-era Boeing B-17G Flying Fortess four-engine heavy bomber flies in formation with a Boeing B-52H Stratofortress eight-engine strategic bomber. The B-17 is a Lockheed Vega B-17G-105-VE, 44-85718. This B-52, 60-0054, has been in active service for more than 55 years. (U.S. Air…

Read More

18 September 1928

Sep 18, 2017

Graf Zeppelin over the airship hangars at Friedrichshafen. (The Lothians collection) 18 September 1928: The rigid airship, Graf Zeppelin, LZ 127, made its first flight at Friedrichshafen, Germany. Graf Zeppelin was named after Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich August Graf von Zeppelin, a German general and count, the founder of Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH (the Zeppelin Airship Company). The airship was…

Read More

18 September 1919

Sep 18, 2017

Roland Rohlfs after setting an FAI altitude record of 9,241 meters (30,318 feet) at Garden City, New York, 20 July 1919. The airplane is the Curtiss 18T-2 Wasp, Bu. No. A3325. (San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives) 18 September 1919: Curtiss Engineering Corporation test pilot Roland Rohlfs set a Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World…

Read More

18 September 1918

Sep 18, 2017

Major Rudolph William Schroeder, U.S. Army Air Corps. 18 September 1918: Major Rudolph William Schroeder, Chief Test Pilot of the Engineering Division, McCook Field, Ohio, flew a Packard Lepère LUSAC 11 biplane to two Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World Records when he reached 9,455 meters (31,020.34 feet).¹ ² This was 839 meters (2,752.62 feet) higher than he had flown in…

Read More

16 September 2011

Sep 16, 2017

Unlimited Division racer The Galloping Ghost just before impact. The pilot is not visible in the cockpit. (AP photo/Grass Valley Union/Tim O’Brien via The Press Democrat) 16 September 2011: In the late afternoon, six highly-modified World War II-era fighters were competing in a preliminary heat for the Unlimited Division championship of the National Championship Air…

Read More

16 September 1931

Sep 16, 2017

Supermarine S.6B S.1596 (BAE Systems) 16 September 1931: Flight Lieutenant George Hedley Stainforth of the Royal Air Force high-Speed Flight, was flying the second Supermarine S.6B, S.1596, to test an alternate propeller before attempting a 3-kilometer speed record. As he landed on the water following the test flight, his foot became caught in the rudder…

Read More

13 September 1931

Sep 13, 2017

Supermarine S.6B S.1595 at the London Science Museum. (sciencemuseum.org.uk) 13 September 1931: Having won the previous two Coupe d’Aviation Maritime Jacques Schneider international seaplane races, the United Kingdom was in the position of permanently winning the famous Schneider Trophy if it were to win a third consecutive race. The 1931 race was the twelfth in a…

Read More